Difference between revisions of "3D Printing"

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[[Category:FabLab Equipment]]
 
[[Category:FabLab Equipment]]
 
== About ==
 
== About ==
3D printing is an additive manufacturing process that allows for the creation of real-world, tangible objects from 3D virtual models. MakeICT maintains three separate 3D printers: a [[RepRap Prusa Mendel]]:, an [[Ultimaker 2]], and a [[Rostock Max V2]]. Full details and specifications can be found on the individual equipment pages.
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3D printing is an additive manufacturing process that allows for the creation of real-world, tangible objects from 3D virtual models. MakeICT maintains the following 3D printers:
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{| class="wikitable sortable"
 
{| class="wikitable sortable"
 
|-
 
|-
! !! [[RepRap Prusa Mendel]] !! [[Ultimaker 2]] !! [[Rostock Max v2]]
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! {{:Ultimaker 2}} ! {{:Rostock Max v2}} ! {{:Creality CR-10S}} ! {{:Prusa i3 MK3}}
|-
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| Build volume || 180 x 180 x 100ish mm || 210 x 210 x 200 mm || 260 (circle) x 375 mm
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|-
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| Max Nozzle Temperature || 250 C || 400 C || 295 C
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|-
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| Filament types || PLA, ABS || PLA, ABS || PLA, ABS
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|-
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| Filament diameter || 1.75 mm || 1.75 mm || 1.75 mm
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|-
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| X/Y resolution || 0.125 mm || 0.125 mm || 0.1 mm
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|-
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| Z resolution || .0039 mm || 0.02 mm || 0.0125 mm
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|-
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| Nozzle diameter || 0.35 mm || 0.4 mm || 0.5 mm
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|-
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| Heated bed || Yes || Yes || Yes (it's slow!)
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|}
 
|}
  

Revision as of 23:18, 4 June 2018

About

3D printing is an additive manufacturing process that allows for the creation of real-world, tangible objects from 3D virtual models. MakeICT maintains the following 3D printers:

Ultimaker 2
noframe
Ultimaker 2 3D printer
Technical Specifications
Build Volume 210 x 210 x 200 mm
Filament Types PLA, ABS
Filament Sizes 1.75 mm
X/Y Resolution 0.125mm
Z Resolution 0.02mm
Nozzle Diameter 0.4mm
Max Nozzle Temperature 400° C
Heated Bed yes
Max Bed Temperature 100° C
Additional Information
User Manual Ultimaker 2 - User Manual v1.13.pdf
Website Ultimaker 2 Support

Features

Due to its ease of use and ability to produce high quality prints, the Ultimaker 2 is the most popular 3D printer at MakeICT. It has been upgraded with an E3D V6 hotend and geared E3D Titan extruder for increased reliability. Unlike the stock version, it uses 1.75mm filament which is the standard among all 3 of the printers at the makerspace.

Access Policy

See 3D Printing for access policy.

Use

See 3D Printing#Workflow for workflow information.

Acquisition

This printer was purchased using grant money from the Wichita Community Foundation and the Knight Foundation. !

Rostock Max V2
noframe
Rostock Max V2 3D Printer
Technical Specifications
Build Volume 260 (circular) x 375 mm
Filament Types PLA, ABS
Filament Sizes 1.75 mm
X/Y Resolution 0.1mm
Z Resolution 0.0125
Nozzle Diameter 0.5mm
Max Nozzle Temperature 295° C
Heated Bed yes (SLOW)
Max Bed Temperature 110° C
Additional Information
User Manual Rostock-MAX-v2-User-Guide-1stEdition.pdf
Website Rostock Max V2 Product Page

Features

The Rostock has the largest build area of MakeICT's 3D printers.

Access Policy

See 3D_Printing#Machine_Access_Policy for access policy.

Use

See 3D Printing#Workflow for workflow information.

Acquisition

This printer was purchased with money.

The printer has been updated to run on Marlin configuration.h here: Rostock_Configuration !

Creality CR-10S
noframe
Stock image of Creality CR-10s
Technical Specifications
Build Volume 300 x 300 x 400 mm
Filament Types PLA, ABS
Filament Sizes 1.75mm
X/Y Resolution 0.01 mm
Z Resolution ~0.01 mm
Nozzle Diameter 0.4 mm
Max Nozzle Temperature 250° C
Heated Bed Yes
Max Bed Temperature 100° C
Additional Information
User Manual [[Media:|]]
Website [ ]

Features

This printer has the largest build volume of all the printers at MakeICT.

Access Policy

See 3D_Printing#Machine_Access_Policy for access policy.

Use

See 3D Printing#Workflow for workflow information.

Acquisition

This printer was purchased using funds donated by members during a special fundraising effort. !

Prusa i3 MK3
noframe
Stock image of Prusa i3 MK3
Technical Specifications
Build Volume 250 x 210 x 200 mm
Filament Types PLA, ABS
Filament Sizes 1.75mm
X/Y Resolution 0.01 mm
Z Resolution ~0.01 mm
Nozzle Diameter 0.4 mm
Max Nozzle Temperature 300° C
Heated Bed Yes
Max Bed Temperature 100° C
Additional Information
User Manual https://manual.prusa3d.com/c/Original_Prusa_i3_MK3_kit_assembly
Website Prusa i3 MK3 Store Page

Features

This printer has a number of advanced features that are not present on any of our other machines:

  • Filament sensor to detect jams and material depletion
  • Automatic bed leveling
  • Head crash detection

Access Policy

See 3D_Printing#Machine_Access_Policy for access policy.

Use

See 3D Printing#Workflow for general workflow information.

DO NOT SPRAY BED WITH HAIRSPRAY!

Before Printing

In order for prints to adhere properly the bed must be clean. Wipe it down with isopropyl alcohal (NOT acetone!) before a print to ensure that the bed is free of oils and dust. The exception to this rule is if you are printing PETG. When printing PETG you need to apply glue stick to prevent the material from bonding too strongly with the bed and causing damage.

See this link for more information on bed preparation: https://help.prusa3d.com/article/6Gtws6Yqjg-pei-print-surface-preparation

Filament Change

  • Press the click wheel once for menu
  • Select preheat and choose the appropriate material
  • Once heated, press the click wheel for menu
  • Scroll down and choose 'Unload Filament'
  • Remove filament immediately
  • Insert new material and it should automatically load
    • If it doesn't load automatically, select 'Autoload Filament' or 'Load Filament' from the menu and follow prompts

Print Removal

DO NOT USE SCRAPERS!

Lift the spring steel sheet off of the bed by the front corners. Gently flex the bed in both directions until the print loosens enough to be removed.

Acquisition

This printer was purchased using a combination of membership dues and targeted donations. Thanks to everyone who donated!

Machine Access Policy

Use of the 3D printers requires authorization from an approved peer-authorizor or attendance in a 3D printer workshop that includes authorization.

  • Any member who has been authorized to use the 3D printer may peer-authorize other members
  • Authorization instruction must at least include
    • Fundamental knowledge of each printer's working principles
    • Proper use and control of each printer
    • Software workflow
    • How to change filament
    • How to pay for material

Filament Fund

Printing with filament provided by MakeICT costs $0.04 per gram. After printing, please weigh your print using the provided scale and put the appropriate amount of money in the filament fund jar. If you have any requests for new colors/types of filaments, you can write them on the same jar.

Workflow

Note: This process is under development and may change. Check back here for updates if something changes.

Slicing

Slicing is the process of converting an STL file to the G-Code required to run the printer.

Any slicer with an appropriately configured profile can be used to generate G-Code to run the machines. We have setup Slic3r with profiles for each machine on the design computer in the Fab Lab, and are working to configure the same for Cura. These profiles are available on the Slicer Profiles page on this Wiki.

Slic3r has native support for uploading to Octoprint, just hit the 'Upload to printer' button in the 'Plater' tab. In Cura just export the G-Code file and upload it using the file browser in Octoprint.

When slicing, be sure to use the correct profile for the machine you intend to print on. G-Code generated for one machine WILL NOT work properly on the others.

Printing

Each printer can be run using Octoprint. Thorough instructions on this interface can be found on the Octoprint page. The username and password are 'maker'.

The printers can be reached at the following addresses while connected to the network at MakeICT:

To run a print: select your file and click the print button.

General Use Tips

  • When changing from a filament that prints hotter to one that prints cooler (e.g. ABS to PLA) you should do a cold pull to remove the old plastic that is lining the melt chamber. Otherwise there will likely be problems with underextrusion due to the unmelted plastic. (Not necessary or effective with e3d hotends)
  • When your print is finished, do not immediately turn off the power; wait until the nozzle has cooled. The Ultimaker and Rostock have actively cooled heatsinks on their hotends, and if power is cut before the nozzle is cool the filament can melt higher up than intended and cause a jam.
  • Be careful when removing prints. The glass beds are fairly durable, but can be cracked with excessive force. No hammers, mallets, or other bludgeoning devices are to be used for print removal!
  • G-Code files generated for one printer should never be used on another. Re-run the slicer with the appropriate profiles for the machine that is being used
  • Check material before starting a print. Make sure it is the correct type, and that there is enough to complete the print.

References

3D Printer Authorized Users

To see authorized users expand this section --->

Name Authorization Date Authorized By
Abishek Gomes 2015-12-19 Dominic Canare
Adam Wiley 2016-03-30 Christian Kindel
Alec Wilford 2015-12-17 Dominic Canare
Anna Lenhart Murray 2016-06-01 James Lancaster
Audrey Barba 2016-06-15 James Lancaster
Barry Wright 2015-12-19 Dominic Canare
Brian Bush 2016-06-09 James Lancaster
Blake Baysinger 2016-06-27 Turquoise Thomas-Morales
Bob Kralicek 2016-06-27 Turquoise Thomas-Morales
Brock Milford 2015-12-15 Dominic Canare
Bryan Barr
Cat Barba-Abay 2015-12-17 Dominic Canare
Chris Batcheller 2015-12-19 Dominic Canare
Chris DeVries 2015-12-15 Dominic Canare
Christian Kindel
Daniel Towle 2015-12-15 Dominic Canare
Derek Alexander 2015-12-19 Dominic Canare
Dominic Canare James Lancaster
Dustin Richey
Elaine Hanna 2015-12-17 Dominic Canare
Julie Chen 2016-06-27 Turquoise Thomas-Morales
James Lancaster
James Seymour 2016-06-01 James Lancaster
Jeff Eck
Jim Hammer 2015-12-15 Dominic Canare
Joel Ewy 2016-08-11 Kip Landwehr
John Alexander 2016-3-21 Mike Barushok
Kip Landwehr
Marcia Stevens 2015-12-17 Dominic Canare
Marcus Mosley 2015-12-19 Dominic Canare
Mark Esau 2015-12-15 Dominic Canare
Matthew Warren 2015-12-15 Dominic Canare
Mason Baysinger 2016-06-27 Turquoise Thomas-Morales
Mike Barushok 2015-11-21
Mike Doolittle
Penny Kralicek 2016-06-27 Turquoise Thomas-Morales
Bob Jackson 2015-12-15 Dominic Canare
Reed Schimmel 2016-3-21 Mike Barushok
Sam McConnell 2015-11-24 Dominic Canare
Sam Schurter 2015-12-15 Dominic Canare
Steffin Gomes 2015-12-19 Dominic Canare
Steve Querbach 2015-12-19 Dominic Canare
Tom McGuire
Turquoise Thomas-Morales 2016-5-31 James Lancaster
Westin Vice 2015-12-15 Dominic Canare
Wilburt Guymon 2015-12-15 Dominic Canare
William Davisson 2015-12-15 Dominic Canare
Zach Puls 2015-11-24 Dominic Canare
Eric Sommer 2016-05-01 Christian Kindel
Rustin Atkeisson 2016-05-01 Christian Kindel
Logan Pajunen 2016-05-01 Sam McConnell
Alex Kern 2016-07-03 Christian Kindel
Cindy Conrad 2016-07-03 Christian Kindel
Curt Gridley 2016-07-03 Christian Kindel
Dale Morrow 2016-07-03 Christian Kindel
Dana Danaver 2016-07-03 Christian Kindel
David Springs 2016-07-03 Christian Kindel
Mark Satoria 2016-07-03 Christian Kindel
Paul Poirier 2016-07-03 Christian Kindel
Phil Ross 2016-07-03 Christian Kindel
Roy Hosie 2016-07-03 Christian Kindel
Steve Saner 2016-07-03 Christian Kindel
Tom Conrad 2016-07-03 Christian Kindel
Tristan Jones 2016-07-03 Christian Kindel
Ryan Olsen 2016-08-15 Christian Kindel
Alexander Tackett 2016-08-15 Christian Kindel
Recil Robinson 2016-08-27 David Springs
Joe Groom 2016-12-08 Christian Kindel
Steve Owens 2016-12-08 Christian Kindel